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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE AND GENDER AS RELATIVES OF WORKPLACE INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

CLIMATE AND GENDER AS RELATIVES OF WORK INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

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ABSTRACT

 

This study examines the relationship between organizational climate and gender as predictors of interpersonal relationships at work. The study population consists of 200 employees of the Dangote group of companies. The researcher utilized questionnaires as the data gathering instrument. Descriptive Utilizing a survey research design, this study was conducted. The study utilized 133 respondents comprised of HRMs, administration personnel, senior staffs, and junior staffs. The acquired data were tabulated and evaluated using straightforward percentages and frequencies.

FIRST PART

Context of the study
Members of any organization must be able to interact effectively with their supervisors, subordinates, and coworkers within the business, as well as with consumers, suppliers, and the general public outside. Therefore, interpersonal ties are a crucial aspect of any business. Most organizations have human resource issues rather than business issues. People issues stem from dysfunctional interpersonal relationships, which impede the achievement of organizational objectives. Therefore, efforts should be made to improve the interpersonal skills of the employees.

Individuals with varying behavioral traits interact with one another in the workplace. Interpersonal interactions at work may be influenced by these persons’ behavioral traits. Dissimilar personal behaviors brought to the workplace frequently manifest themselves through interactive work procedures (Stoetzer, Ahlberg, Zapf, Knorz, and Kulla, 1996). Prior studies analyzed the interpersonal interactions at work from the perspective of the employee’s living and working conditions. There have been consistent findings in both the social psychology and organisational psychology literature regarding gender differences in friendships. Although friendship relationships between men and women are similar in many ways (Wright, 1988), and there are large variations within the genders in terms of their behavior in same-sex friendships (Walker, 1994), there have been consistent findings of gender differences in friendships. Friendships between women have been described as communal and as including more self-disclosure, support, and intricacy than friendships between men (Markiewicz, Devine, & Kausilas, 2000; Winstead, 1986; Wright, 1988, 1991). Men’s friendships can be regarded as instrumental; they are typically organized around shared interests and activities and are action-oriented as opposed to person-centered (Markiewicz et al., 2000; Messner, 1992; Winstead, 1986; Wright, 1988, 1991). Males’s relationships with other men are typically competitive (Bird, 2003; Messner, 1992) and less likely to involve the expression of emotional emotions (Odden & Sias, 1997; Wood & Inman, ). Men and women derive emotional support and therapeutic benefit from their interactions with women (Sapadin, 1988; Veniegas & Peplau, 1997), presumably due to women’s greater comfort with intimacy and their emphasis on successful relationships as part of their self-concept (Markiewicz et al., 2000). In general, both women and men view friendships with women as more pleasurable, nurturing, and of higher quality overall (Sapadin, 1988). Men accomplish and define closeness through the sharing of activities, whereas women define and achieve closeness through the sharing of sentiments and emotions, according to literature focusing on interpersonal connections about the function of friendships (Odden & Sias, 1997; Wood & Inman, ). Ashton and Fuerhrer () discovered that males are less likely than females to seek emotional support when worried or apprehensive. Additionally, Flaherty and man (1989) note that the provision of social and emotional support was more likely to be a function of women’s relationships, with women getting and providing more emotional social support than males during times of distress.

EXPRESSION OF THE PROBLEM

Organisations throughout the world are comprised of individuals with similar aims, objectives, ambitions, and perspectives who work together to accomplish what one individual cannot do alone. If, as a result, the people who make up the organization do not interact positively with one another, it will be difficult to achieve the organization’s objectives. There are organizations where there are no cordial relationships between staff members, subordinates, and superiors; for instance, when strife, jealousy, hatred, bias, backbiting, witch-hunting, and many others coexist with the people, conflict is inevitable, which may not be beneficial for the organization. As a result, for a healthy environment in any organization, individuals must recognize their differences and engage in the “give and take” that is the foundation of a genuine and authentic connection.

PURPOSE OF THE STUDY
The study’s aims are as follows:

To determine the importance of interpersonal relationships in the workplace.
To determine the characteristics that influence interpersonal relationships in the workplace
Determine the association between organizational climate and gender interpersonal relationships in the workplace
RESEARCH HYPOTHESES
The researcher formulated the following research hypotheses for the successful completion of the study:

There are no characteristics that influence interpersonal relationships at work.

There are aspects that influence interpersonal relationships in the workplace (H1).

 

There is no correlation between organizational environment and gender interpersonal relationships in the workplace,

H2: there is a correlation between workplace organizational climate and gender interpersonal relationships

THE IMANCE OF THE STUDY
Students, organizations, and policymakers will find great value in this study. The study will shed light on the correlation between organizational environment and gender and interpersonal relationships at work. The work will also serve as a resource for future academics who investigate the same subject.

SCOPE AND BOUNDS OF THE STUDY
The study’s scope includes organizational climate and gender as predictors of interpersonal relationships at work. The researcher faces a constraint that restricts the study’s scope;

a) AVLABILITY OF RESEARCH MATERIAL: The researcher has insufficient research material, consequently limiting the scope of the investigation.
b) TIME: The time allotted for the study does not allow for a broader scope because the researcher must mix it with other academic activities and examinations.
DEFINITION OF TERMS

CLIMATE: On the other hand, organizational climate is sometimes characterized as the repeating patterns of behavior, attitudes, and feelings that characterize life within an organization, whereas an organization’s culture tends to be stable. Although culture and climate are intertwined, climate is frequently simpler to analyze and alter.

Gender is the spectrum of qualities that belong to and differentiate masculinity and femininity. These qualities may include biological sex, sex-based social institutions, or gender identity, depending on the setting.

INTERPERSONAL Connection: An interpersonal relationship is a powerful, profound, or close interaction or acquaintance between two or more persons that can range in duration from brief to permanent. The context might range from familial or kinship ties to friendship, marriage, business, clubs, communities, and places of worship.

1.8 STRUCTURE OF THE STUDY

This study project is divided into five chapters for simple comprehension:

The introduction comprises the (overview, of the study), historical context, description of the problem, aims of the investigation, research hypotheses, relevance of the study, scope and limitations of the study, definition of words, and historical context of the study. The second chapter focuses on the theoretical framework upon which the investigation is based, therefore the literature review. The third chapter discusses the study’s research strategy and methodology. Chapter four focuses on data collection, , and findings presentation. The study’s summary, conclusion, and suggestions are presented in Chapter 5.

CLIMATE AND GENDER AS RELATIVES OF WORK INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS

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