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AN APPRAISAL OF THE DOCTRINE OF NON-INTERVENTION IN INTERNATIONAL LAW

AN APPRAISAL OF THE DOCTRINE OF NON-INTERVENTION IN INTERNATIONAL

 

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CHAPTER ONE

1.0 GENERAL INTRODUCTION
1.1 Background of the Study

On June 26, 1945, in San Francisco, California, United States of America, the United s Charter was first formally signed. On October 24, 1945, the United s formally ratified the Charter [1]. As a direct reaction to the challenges recognized as posing a threat to the global community and addressed during the conference where the Charter was prepared and signed, a number of further meetings were organized in diverse locales [2]. This threat may be traced back to events that occurred immediately after the conclusion of the First World War as well as during the Second World War. The global economic recession of the late 1920s and early 1930s, the growth of potentially hazardous anti-democratic and nationalist ideas, and the breakdown and final dissolution of the League of s are examples. The aggressive forces of fascism in Italy, Nazism in Germany, and militarism in Japan were among the others. All of these things were recognized as threats to the peace and security of the international community, and they had to be eliminated in order to maintain the peace and security of the international community.

In a series of meetings, member states formed an agreement that a comprehensive triumph over their foes was a requirement for the protection of life, liberty, independence, and freedom, as well as the preservation of human rights and justice in their own countries and beyond. They also agreed to battle together against the barbarous and vicious forces who were attempting to enslave the entire world [3]. By signing the Declaration, each nation pledged to the international community that it would employ all of its military and economic resources against the members of the tripartite pact and its adherents with whom it was at war, as well as cooperate with the s that had also signed the Declaration, and that it would not negotiate a separate armistice or peace treaty with its enemies.

Nonetheless, when the Charter was being prepared, the Member States came to an agreement that a difference should be established between activities that were deemed to be purely domestic and those that were inside the international sphere.

equently, the United s Charter was revised at the very end to add the principle of non-intervention. Consequently, Article 2 of the United s Charter provides, among other things:

The United s Charter reads, “Nothing contained in the present Charter shall permit the United s to interfere in problems which are ally within the domestic authority of any state or compel the members to submit such concerns to resolution under the present Charter.” “Nothing in the current Charter shall obligate the members to submit such concerns for resolution in accordance with the existing Charter.” [4] An  Appraisal of the Doctrines of Non-Intervention in International Law.

The concept underlying this is often known as the non-intervention principle. Since then, the have been

being improperly exploited by the global community

1.2 Statement of the Problem

Since the 24th of October, 1945, when the United s Charter was adopted, it seems that illegal international involvement by one state against another has remained unchecked. Because human activities are not fixed but rather fluid, there have been countless alterations in the circumstances, interests, and goals prioritized by individuals. As a consequence of international law, several concepts, philosophies, ideologies, and norms have emerged. 69 years after the signing and entry into effect of the main Charter of the United s, these have prompted a reevaluation of the previous funda idea or vision of the principle of non-interference5. In 1945, the primary concern of the United s was how to prevent the outbreak of additional global wars, how to advance the cause of international peace and security by bringing together the various members of the international community, and how to reach consensus on a peace agenda, which was believed to be the one and only effective means of achieving these objectives.

 

AN APPRAISAL OF THE DOCTRINE OF NON-INTERVENTION IN INTERNATIONAL

 

DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE PROJECT MATERIAL

 

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