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EDUCATION

THE IMPACT OF INTERNET ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

THE IMPACT OF INTERNET ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

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THE IMPACT OF INTERNET ON THE ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

CHAPITRE ONE

1.1 THE 'S BACKGROUND

The Internet is being used by an increasing number of individuals globally (1,574,313,184 as of December 31, 2008). Adolescents today spend a large amount of time on the Internet for a variety of reasons, according to recent research (Ito, Horst, Bittanti, Boyd, Herr-Stephenson, Lange, et al., 2008).

According to studies, adolescents can benefit from using the Internet to accomplish coursework more successfully and efficiently (Borzekowski & Robinson, 2005; Jackson et al., 2006). Other researchers, however, have found direct negative consequences of Internet use on academic outcomes (Choi, 2007; Sirgy, Lee, & Bae, 2006). Excessive Internet use has been linked to difficulties with daily routines, academic achievement, and family relationships (Rickert, 2001).

The Internet is a global network of computers that enables for the flow of information. The United States Department of Defence established the Internet in the early 1960s, principally for military objectives (Schneider, Evans, & Pinard, 2006).

Since then, the continuous advancement of Internet technology has provided an extraordinary level of public accessibility to a wide range of forms of communication, such as intra- and inter-organizational email; data storage, management, and transfer; social websites such as Facebook; text messaging services such as Twitter, and so on.

The use of the Internet has expanded substantially as a result of the development and distribution of less expensive and more user-friendly computer hardware and software (e.g., portable PCs, Word, and so on). In , 28.7% of the world's population used the Internet.

While this may not appear to be a huge proportion of the world's population, the growth in Internet use has been rapid. For example, the rate of growth in Internet use was 444.8% between 2000 and 2010 (Internet World Stats, 2010).

There are numerous advantages to using the Internet, including access to necessary information, global access to news and events, and interpersonal communication via email. However, since the Internet and its use have grown exponentially, there has been a growing global worry about the hazards connected with excessive Internet use (Buchholz, 2009; Daily News, 2008, 2009; Fackler, 2008; Janta, 2008; Khaosod, 2007; The connected Press, 2009).

It is now thought that there is widespread “addiction” to it, particularly among and university students (Chou & Hsiao, 2000; Fortson, Scotti, Chen, Malone, & Del Ben, 2007; Kim, et al., 2010; Morahan-Martin & Schumacher, 2000; Scherer, 1997; H. Yan, Liu, Ni, & Chen, 2009; M. Yang et al., 2009)..

The Internet plays a critical role in organisations and society. The fundamental reality justifies the recent information revolution that has occurred over the world. According to Cawkell in Ogedebe (2004, p.152), the Internet is a massive computer network made up of thousands of interconnected networks that serves a wide range of services such as electronic, file transfer protocol, database access, and many more. As a result, the success story of the Internet is not surprising.

 

It should be highlighted, for obvious reasons, that the impact of Internet access on on-campus instruction is still quite modest for a variety of reasons: The technology is new, expensive, and may pose a threat to traditional academic structures and traditions.

and Duguid (1996) supported this point of view. The impact of the internet on student academic performance varies depending on the population. In a recent study, Sanni et al (2009) discovered a gender difference in internet use, indicating that adequate attention should be devoted to guaranteeing equitable access for male and female students.

The study also establishes that the current level of capability for internet-assisted research is encouraging and that enhancing internet facilities in our universities will improve in Nigerian tertiary institutions if implemented wisely. According to a survey of the literature, teachers and students are the most frequent users of the Internet, primarily for instructional purposes rather than for amusement.

Several studies have been conducted. Oagboro (2003), Panda and Sahu (2003), and Hanauer (2004) have established a high level of Internet access and use among college students. According to Hanauer's (2004) research, 83% of Internet users had access at home and 51% had access at colleges or libraries.

Eighty-one percent of students use the Internet primarily for schoolwork, while 80% use it for e-mail/chat. Mishra, Yadav, and Bisht (2005) conducted a study of undergraduate students' Internet usage trends at the G B Pant University of Agriculture and Technology in Pantnagar.According to their findings, the Internet was used by the majority of students (85.7%), with 61.5% of males and 51.6% of females using it to prepare assignments.

The majority of respondents, 83.1% male and 61.3% female, identified sluggish Internet connection performance as a serious concern.

Robinson (2005) investigated Internet use among African-American college students and reported that the majority of students used the Internet at school or at work. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting conducted a study of children's Internet use in the United States in 2002.

Between 2000 and 2002, youngsters saw the equivalent of adolescent growth in their Internet use, according to the findings. 65% of American children aged 2-17 were seen using the Internet from home, school, or another venue, representing a 59 percent increase over 2000, when 41% of children went online from any location (CTF, 2002).

Despite the Internet's utility for students, various research have looked at the detrimental impacts it may have on teenagers. Immoral content, for example, can be seen in the closet, on a laptop, on a palmtop, and so on without fear of anyone discovering what is being eaten.

According to Longe et al. (2007), the Internet has also functioned as a platform for paedophiles who take advantage of children's and teenagers' naivety by engaging them in sex chat rooms and finally inviting them to sexual exploits. According to Hertlein and Piercy (2006), people are increasingly using the Internet to develop friendships and romances, as well as to commence extramarital affairs.

They conducted a careful examination of the literature on Internet infidelity. According to Cheryl (2007), the average age of a child when first exposed to Internet pornography is 11 years old, with the 12-to-17-year-old age group being the largest consumers of pornography in America.

Almost 90% of eight to sixteen-year-olds have viewed pornography online, the majority while completing homework. The purpose of this research is to look into how secondary school pupils in Nigeria use and misuse the Internet.

1.2  STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

Despite the Internet's utility for students, various research have looked at the detrimental impacts it may have on teenagers. Immoral content, for example, can be seen in the closet, on a laptop, on a palmtop, and so on without fear of anyone discovering what is being eaten.

According to Longe et al. (2007), the Internet has also functioned as a platform for paedophiles who take advantage of children's and teenagers' naivety by engaging them in sex chat rooms and finally inviting them to sexual exploits. According to Hertlein and Piercy (2006), people are increasingly using the Internet to develop friendships and romances, as well as to commence extramarital affairs.

Things are changing globally, and there are different and modern ways of doing things, if the essence of educational policy is to produce man-power capable of coping with the ever-changing modern world and being a part of the global village “the chalk and talk method”; hardly bringing participatory interaction method must give way to the use of innovation and technology driven which ICT proffers.

Things are changing globally, and there are different and modern ways of doing things, if the essence of educational policy is to produce man-power capable of coping with the ever-changing modern world and being a part of the global village “the chalk and talk method”; hardly bringing participatory interaction method must give way to the use of innovation and technology driven which ICT proffers.

The anomalous and endless erosion of education quality at all levels over the years is one of the most overwhelming and visible elements of today's educational systems and organisations. The West African Examination and National Examination Council results have consistently revealed this groyne reality, which urgently requires action.

Thus, the goal of this study is to provide a framework for the revival of the educational system, as well as to determine the impact and effects of the internet on academic performance of secondary school students through the use of ICT, as well as to investigate the issues associated with the use of the internet in the teaching and learning process.

1.3 THE STUDY'S OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of this research is to look into the impact of the internet on secondary school pupils' academic performance. The precise goals are as follows:

1. Determine the extent to which pupils are exposed to the internet.

2. Determine the impact of the internet on pupils' academic achievement.

3. Determine the cause of internet abuse among teenagers and adolescents.

4. Determine how familiar the teachers are with internet resources.

1.4 QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH

The following research questions will help the researcher attain the stated goals:

1. How familiar are the kids with internet resources?

2. Is there a significant association between internet use and student academic performance?

3. What are the causes of internet abuse among young people?

4. How familiar are the teachers with internet resources?

1.5 THE STUDY'S IMPORTANCE

This research will expose students, lecturers/teachers, parents, government at various levels, and the general public to the effects of the internet on teaching as well as the national development on the suggestions that, if implemented properly, will reduce teachers' burden in teaching jobs while also facilitating teaching and learning activities.

It will also allow students to learn without the use of a teacher as an intermediary, as well as exposing them to the usage of Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and other technologies, allowing Nigerian education to compete with that of well-developed countries.

1.6 STUDY OBJECTIVES

This survey includes all students in the federal republic of Nigeria, however samples were gathered from four schools in two local government areas in Lagos and Ogun states due to cost and time constraints. The following schools were used:

1. D. Ivy College

2. Secondary School of the Air Force

3. Iganmode Primary School

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