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MEDICAL

INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY SCIENCE TEACHERS’ TECHNOLOGICAL PENDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND THE IMPACT ON STUDENT PERFORMANCE IN SELECTED PUBLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS

INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY TEACHERS’ TECHNOLOGICAL PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND THE ON PERFORMANCE IN SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to look into the technological pendagogical content knowledge of science teachers and the effects on student performance in a few public secondary schools. The study’s total population is 200 staff members from selected secondary schools in Ibada, Oyo state.

The researcher collected data using questionnaires as the instrument. This study used a descriptive survey research design. The study included 133 respondents who were principals, vice principals, teachers, and marketers. The collected data was organized into tables and analyzed using simple percentages and frequencies.

chapter One

Introduction

1.1The Study’s Background

The development of teachers’ knowledge bases for improving room practice and student learning is a major concern in science teacher education (, Friedrichsen & Abell, 2013; Kind, 2009). This concern, according to De Jong, Veal, and Van Driel (2002), arose first as a result of studies that show a strong relationship between what teachers know (content knowledge) and how they teach (pedagogical knowledge).

Second, constructivist perspectives on science teaching and learning suggest that teachers’ knowledge base must include knowledge of students’ preconceptions or alternative frameworks that could be used as the foundation of a good teaching point on students’ behalf.

Subject matter content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and knowledge of students’ preconceptions and learning difficulties are the three types of teacher knowledge that Shulman (1986) and others (Loughran, Berry, & Mulhall, 2012) have collectively referred to as pedagogical content knowledge (PCK).

Pedagogical content knowledge has simply been defined as teacher knowledge that enables teachers to assist students in accessing specific content knowledge in a meaningful manner (Miller, 2007). Recent global trends in science education enrollment show that few students choose science as a secondary school subject. Furthermore, there is widespread poor performance and negative attitudes toward the subject matter (Barmby, Kind & Jones, 2008; Kazeni & Onwu, 2013).

The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework is commonly used for understanding, learning, and describing various knowledge types required by professors or teachers (Mishra & Koehler, 2006). Proper guidance is provided by decision and policy makers when developing an education system’s policy in order to develop and implement technologies in teaching and learning (Lee, 2002).

However, technological advancements in education should not only be prioritized; there is also a need for more effective learning tools (Romeo, 2006). The impact of information and communication technology () on various learning processes is positive (Romeo, 2006).

The conceptualization of pedagogical approaches is accomplished through the development of three overlapping components of learning: content, pedagogy, and technology. According to Cox and Graham (2009), TPACK can help educators understand the potential contributions of new technologies in education. Graham (2011) claims that TPACK can be used to assess how teachers’ professional development affects their performance in the room when using .

The added value of TPACK is found in the technology support it provides students in their learning and development of conceptual and procedural attributes (Voogt, Fisser, Pareja Roblin, Tondeur & Van Braak, 2013). Based on this context, the researcher wishes to investigate science teachers’ technological pendagogical content knowledge and its impact on student performance.

Problem identification

Traditional learning methods must be modified to accommodate advanced learning approaches that make use of . According to Bransford, , and Cocking (2000), general teaching skills are required to revise with the use of advanced technologies for effective teaching. Meanwhile, Lee (2002) proposed that, with the integration of into schools, teachers should serve as mentors rather than experts in education.

The purpose of this study was to look into the technological pendagogical content knowledge of science teachers and the effects on student performance in a few public secondary schools. The current study has contributed to a better understanding of Nigerian teachers’ levels of knowledge in Technology, Pedagogy, and Content of Science Subjects, particularly Biology Science Subjects.

This may also be useful in other countries where teachers have not used technology effectively. The study validates and reinforces the importance of technology in teacher preparation, which benefits other countries as well.

The study’s objective

The study’s objectives are as follows:

To investigate the role of technology in the teaching of science in secondary school.
Determine the relationship between technological pendagogical content knowledge and science student academic performance.
To assess secondary school teachers’ knowledge of technology, pedagogy, and science content.
Hypotheses for research

The following hypotheses are advanced:

H0: There is no contribution of technology to secondary school science teaching.

H1: Technology contributes to the teaching of science in secondary school.

H0: There is no relationship between technological pendagogical content knowledge and science student academic performance.

H2: There is a link between technological pendagogical content knowledge and science student academic performance.

The study’s importance

The study will be extremely useful to students, teachers, the Ministry of , and policymakers. The study will provide a clear picture of science teachers’ technological pendagogical content knowledge and its effects on student performance.

The research will shed light on the role of technology in education, particularly in the teaching of science. The study will also be used as a resource for other researchers who will be working on a similar topic.

The study’s scope and limitations

The study’s scope includes investigating science teachers’ technological pendagogical content knowledge and its effects on student performance in selected public secondary schools. The study will only be conducted in a few government secondary schools in Ibadan.

The following limitations were encountered during the course of this study:

Financial constraint- Inadequate funding tends to impede the researcher’s efficiency in locating relevant materials, literature, or information, as well as in the data collection process (internet, questionnaire and interview).

Time constraint- The researcher will conduct this study alongside other academic work. As a result, the amount of time spent on research will be reduced.

DEFINITION OF TERMS IN BUSINESS

Technology is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or the achievement of goals such as scientific research.

Anything that has to do with teaching is pedagogical.

The adjective pedagogical, which is pronounced “peh-duh-GAH-gi-cal,” is derived from the Greek word paidaggikos, which means “teacher.” If it’s pedagogical, it’s about teaching, from lesson plans to teaching methods, and even how the room looks.

Content knowledge refers to the facts, concepts, theories, and principles taught and learned in specific academic courses, rather than related skills such as reading, writing, or researching that students also learn in school.

Biology is a natural science that deals with the study of life and living organisms. Modern is a vast and diverse field comprised of numerous specialized disciplines that investigate the structure, function, growth, distribution, evolution, or other characteristics of living organisms.

 

 

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INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY TEACHERS’ TECHNOLOGICAL PENDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE AND THE ON PERFORMANCE IN SELECTED PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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