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EDUCATION

DIFFICULTIES AND SKILLS OF A GOOD TEACHER

DIFFICULTIES AND SKILLS OF A GOOD TEACHER

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DIFFICULTIES AND SKILLS OF A GOOD TEACHER

CHAPITRE ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1 THE STUDY'S BACKGROUND

The concept of a good instructor varies depending on the individual. Students' perceptions, opinions, and/or experiences of an excellent instructor vary. A excellent teacher has been described as a perfectionist, encouraging, friendly, and caring at times, intelligent at others, but most of all as enthusiastic, funny, clever, affective and understanding, open, and with a casual teaching style.

According to Holt (1964), instructors' knowledge, excitement, and responsibility for creating a friendly class climate improve “the students' desire to learn and to accept the challenges of thinking and enquiring into all that the teacher offers.” According to Stronge et al. (2004), teaching is a vocation, and most good and quality instructors are enthusiastic about their chosen job. However, he also stated that a competent teacher is constantly learning owing to changes in student characteristics, curriculum, community, and finance, among other things.

“Teachers must be able to survive the demands, threats, and challenges that come with teaching,” writes Gibbs (2002). He emphasised that a good and excellent teacher must be persistent, flexible, and innovative in new teaching ways, as well as be prepared to fail. According to Stronge et al.

(2004), a good teacher has a psychological influence on the students, which has a significant impact on their achievement. According to Killen (2006), a competent teacher is one who has defined objectives and personal teaching goals. A teacher can answer a question for students, but this is only successful if the main goal is merely to compare and analyse different outcomes. However, if the goal is to help the student consider the possibility of presenting different plausible replies, the teacher may be considered as ineffectual.

According to Smith (1995), teachers and teaching must be innovative in order to allow pupils to learn spontaneously. He also suggested that educational institutions devote more time to “doing” rather than “talking about learning and teaching.” Furthermore, Gurney (2007) proposed that, rather than focusing on theory and practise, we should reflect on what we do in the classroom.

A competent teacher should be concerned with their students' progress. Alton-Lee (2003) stated that an effective link between school and cultural context is required, which is frequently regarded as a challenge; aside from being caring, and improving assessment, feedback, and evaluation, as well as being accountable to students' learning processes, curriculum goals, multiple tasks, and contexts.

Gurney (2007) proposed that in order to be a good and excellent teacher, certain aspects need interact. One of them is the teacher's knowledge, enthusiasm, and ownership of the learning process. Another issue is that competent teachers should provide activities and assessments that inspire pupils to learn (and learn by experience), as well as engaged feedback. Finally, to foster a welcoming environment and a relationship with pupils in which respect enhances learning. According to Borich (2000), competent teachers are responsible for lesson clarity, instructional diversity, teacher task orientation, student participation in the learning process, and student success rate.

As a result, competent teachers do not teach in front of the class to demonstrate wide and deep material knowledge; rather, they teach to promote and facilitate learning. Furthermore, they understand how to handle not just their knowledge, but also the classroom and the students in terms of discipline, work, interaction between teacher-student-students, giving instructions, and assessing and evaluating activities, students, and their own work. As a result, being a good teacher necessitates a number of attributes, both professional and personal.

1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

Good teachers are characterised by their passion to their students and the work of teaching, and they hold themselves accountable for their students' progress and success, as well as their own professional development. Good teachers truly believe that all students can learn, even if they do it in various ways. They work hard to motivate and engage all of their students in learning rather than simply accepting that some students cannot be engaged and will perform badly.

There are numerous types of teachers. For example, among many others, there are individuals who walk into the classroom and some students do not even notice them; there are also those who appear to be genuine tyrants, and students are even frightened to ask questions in the classroom.

There are those who read from a book or talk continuously throughout the session, while students simply copy; or those who just talk, and by the end of the lesson, students have no idea what the lesson was about, because the objectives, structure, and/or theme were not clear, even to the teacher. All of this, however, encouraged the researcher to investigate the problems and characteristics of a good teacher in some selected secondary schools in Gboko Local Government Area.

1.3 THE STUDY'S OBJECTIVES

The following are the study's objectives:

To investigate the characteristics of a good teacher.

To identify the difficulties of the teaching profession.

The purpose of this study is to look into the connection between teachers and students in Gboko Local Government Area.

1.4 QUESTIONS FOR

What are the characteristics of a good teacher?

What are the difficulties of the teaching profession?

How do teachers and students interact in Gboko Local Government Area?

1.6 THE STUDY'S

The following are the study's implications:

The findings of this study will educate the general public on the characteristics of good instructors and their impact on student performance and behaviour.

The findings of this study will serve as a beneficial guide for the government and stakeholders in the education sector in addressing the issues of the teaching profession in order to find a long-term solution.

This study will contribute to the body of literature on the effect of personality traits on student academic achievement, forming the empirical literature for future research in the field.

1.7 LIMITATIONS AND SCOPE OF THE STUDY

This research will look at the characteristics of instructors in secondary schools in the Gboko local government region. It will discuss the characteristics of a good teacher as well as the challenges of the teaching profession.

STUDY LIMITATIONS

Financial constraint- A lack of funds tends to restrict the researcher's efficiency in locating relevant , literature, or information, as well as in the data collection procedure (internet, questionnaire, and interview).

Time constraint- The researcher will conduct this investigation alongside other academic activities. As a result, the amount of time spent on research will be reduced.

REFERENCES

A. Alton-Lee (2003), “Quality teaching for diverse students in schooling: Best evidence synthesis”, Wellington: Ministry of Education.

G.D. Borich, “Observation Skills for Effective Learning”, 4th edition, Prentice , UK, 2000.

“Effective teaching: exercising self-efficacy and thought control of action,” C.J. Gibbs, 2002. Annual Conference of the British Educational Research Association, Exeter, England, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. [Accessed on February 19, 2010] http://www.leeds.ac.uk/educol/documents/00002390.htm

P. Gurney (2007) “Five factors for effective teaching” 89-98 in Journal of Teachers' Work, Vol. 4, Issue 2.

J. Holt (1964), “How Children Fail” Dell, New York, USA

R. Killen, “Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons for Research and Practise,” 2006. Thomson, Social Science Press, 4th edition, UK

“Let's declare education a disaster and get on with our lives,” F. Smith (1995). 584-590 in Phi Delta Kappan.

Stronge, J.H., Tucker, P.D., and Hindman, J.L. (2004) “Handbook for Effective Teacher Qualities,” Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA, USA.

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