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EDUCATION EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE PROJECT TOPICS

STUDENT – TEACHERS’ RELATIONSHIP, INTRINSIC MOTIVATION AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

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STUDENT AND TEACHERS RELATIONSH, INTRINSIC MOTIVATION AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF RY SCHOOL STUDENTS

 

 

ABSTR

The study looked at the relationship between students and teachers, intrinsic motivation, and academic performance of secondary school students in the os metropolis. To guide the study, four and four hypotheses were developed. The sample size was 200 Senior Secondary School Students chosen at random. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used in the analysis.

The primary findings were that there is a significant relationship between the student-teacher relationship and academic performance. There is a significant relationship between intrinsic motivation and academic performance; a significant relationship exists between teachers’ personalities and academic performance; and there is a significant difference between students who are intrinsically motivated and those who are not.

The following recommendations were made, among others: teachers should ensure that they create an enabling environment to help students develop healthy self-esteem, positive social adjustment, and academic attainment; students should see their teachers as lovely and approachable surrogate parents who care about their overall development. Parents should instill in their children the importance of respecting and coexisting with their teachers.

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1 THE STUDY’S BACKGROUND

Within the school context, students are involved in a variety of important and influential social relationships, including relationships with teachers and peers. These relationships have an effect on performance in a variety of school domains, including behavioral, social, and academic arenas.

Academic success, or the ability to learn and retain information taught in the classroom, is a key indicator of a child’s academic success. We know that early academic achievement has implications for later development (e.g., Berndt, Hawkins, & Jiao, 1999;

Graziano, Reavis, Keane, & Calkins 2007, Hamre & Pianta, 2001; Pianta & Stuhlman, 2004), including later academic achievement and success and potential opportunities. Given the significance of academic achievement, we must identify early social relationships that can set children on a path to long-term success.

In this day and age of high-stakes testing and accountability for both students and teachers, it is critical to examine the evidence to determine whether these relationships are indeed a factor in raising student achievement. Advocates for the No Child Left Behind (NCLB)

Act argue that focusing on test scores is the best way to improve student achievement. However, learning is a process with cognitive and social psychological dimensions that must be considered if academic achievement is to be maximized (Hallinan, 2008).

An in-depth examination of the variables influencing learning should include research into the factors influencing students’ attitudes toward school and the relationships they form with their teachers. There are two arguments for identifying these factors. First, if students enjoy school, they gain important social benefits such as making friends, developing respect for peers and adults, and learning social skills.

Second, when students enjoy going to school, their academic performance improves (Hallinan, 2008). Whether a teacher-student relationship is close or strained, it appears to both contribute to and be an indicator of a child’s adjustment to school (Pianta & Stuhlman, 2004).

Similarly, humans are propelled by a mechanism known as motivation. Motivation is the term used to describe what we think and why we behave the way we do. According to Adams (2002), in an achievement setting, someone would be concerned with motivation if he were to ask, for example, why some students persist in completing tasks despite difficulty while others give up at the slightest provocation, or why some students set such unrealistically high goals for themselves that failure is unavoidable.

According to Maclean (2006), teachers frequently believe that some students lack motivation. A student who is unmotivated does not exist. Every adolescent has a motivation mindset, but some have stronger learning focus profiles than others. Teachers must accept that all students are motivated in some way, and the challenge is to “tune in” to what motivates students, particularly intrinsic motivation.

Motivation has recently been identified as a critical component of emotional intelligence, encompassing the management of feelings of enthusiasm, confidence, and persistence (Coleman, 1996). According to Rabideau (2009), motivation is the driving force behind all of an individual’s actions.

An individual’s needs and desires both have a strong influence on the direction of their behavior. Motivation is based on your emotions as well as your achievement-related goals. He went on to differentiate between different types of motivation, including extrinsic, intrinsic, physiological, and achievement motivation.

 

1.2 THE ’S STATEMENT

According to Oladele (2009), some of the problems encountered by students in their academics are due to some salient teacher factors such as teacher unapproachability, poor student-teacher relationship, teacher hatred, negative name calling or labeling of students, teacher’s package of his subject, and lack of belief in students’ ability to excel. He went on to say that this is why some students find it difficult to get closer to their teachers in the classroom and learning environment.

Similarly, adolescents in school must be motivated if they are to achieve high academic performance. Teachers who have a habit of motivating their students reap the benefits because students who are motivated through rewards such as praises and other patterns of motivation outperform those who are not motivated intrinsically.

As a result, this study will attempt to investigate the relationship between the teacher-student relationship, intrinsic motivation, and academic performance of secondary school students. This is due to the fact that these two variables are crucial in the academic performance of children and adults in all educational settings.

1.3 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

The study’s goal will be to investigate the relationship between teacher-student relationships, intrinsic motivation, and academic performance of secondary school students in the os Metropolitan Area.

The study’s other specific goals will be as follows:

1. Whether or not intrinsic motivation has a significant impact on academic performance.

2. Whether the teacher-student relationship has an impact on academic performance.

3. Determine whether there is a significant difference in performance between students who are intrinsically motivated and those who are not.

4. Determine whether there is a significant gender difference in the performance of students who are intrinsically motivated.

 

1.4 QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH

1. Is there a link between the teacher-student relationship and academic performance?

2. Is there a connection between intrinsic motivation and academic performance?

3. Is there a link between a teacher’s personality and his or her academic performance?

4. To what extent does a teacher’s personality influence a student’s academic performance?

 

1.5 HYPOTHESIS OF RESEARCH

1. There will be no statistically significant link between the teacher-student relationship and academic performance.

2. There will be no significant relationship between intrinsic motivation and academic performance in students.

3. There will be no significant relationship between the personality of the teacher and academic performance.

4. There will be no statistically significant difference between students who are intrinsically motivated and those who are not.

 

1.6 THE STUDY’S

This research will be extremely beneficial to parents, teachers, and counselors.

It is significant for several reasons. For starters, it will show students why it is important for them to like not only their subjects but also their teachers, because without a cordial and friendly environment, their academic dreams may not be fully realized.

Teachers will be taught about the their relationships with students play in promoting or inhibiting student academic performance, as well as how to use cordial relationships with students to motivate them, which will improve their learning outcomes.

Parents would also learn how to foster healthy relationships between their children and their children by encouraging both parties to be friendly with one another because one cannot succeed without the other.

Guidance and counselors will see this study as beneficial and good because the recommendations will help them counsel people, particularly students who are low academic achievers due to poor or no motivation from their parents or teachers.

This study would be useful to other researchers working on related topics.

 

1.7 THE STUDY’S OBJECTIVE

This research focuses on the teacher-student relationship, intrinsic motivation, and academic performance. It will be limited to senior in the os Metropolitan Area.

 

1.8 TERMS AND CONDITIONS

1. Teacher-student relationships: this refers to the pattern of interactions between the teacher and students in the teaching and learning environment, as well as how such interactions influence learning. The teacher’s interaction with students will be examined in this study in terms of directing questions/activities to students, allowing them to participate in the teaching and learning process, entertaining their questions/opinions, answering their questions, and providing appropriate punishment.

2. Intrinsic motivation: this is motivation to engage in an activity for the sake of its own interest and enjoyment. When we get a sense of accomplishment during an activity rather than afterward.

 

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